The Bainbridge Farmhouse: Completion!

 

modern farmhouse

 

Fulfilling a lifelong dream of building a home on their family’s land, our clients have recently moved in to their new home in the woods, surrounded by tall firs, fern glades and birdsong. This is an intentionally small, simple house, drawing on Bainbridge Island historical references: simple farm structures, Japanese rural dwelling influences due to that unique aspect of the island’s history, and including the warmth and connection to nature that Craftsman architectural elements can offer.

 

country livingFront entryway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that they are retired, this home is a “down-size”. With only 2200sf, all living spaces are open and connected. On the main floor is a master suite as well as an additional bedroom and bath to accommodate visitors. A second floor loft doubles as a quilting workspace and future grandchildren’s sleeping loft. Generous attention has been paid to storage and mudroom spaces due to the reality of country living! The house has been designed so that the owners can “age in place” with wide corridors and doorways, a one-floor living area, and an abundance of natural light.

 

beautiful dining room

 

New kitchen design

 

modern farmhouse loft

 

covered porch modern farmhouse

 

We have been sharing the progress of this project on our blog since the very beginning, from the initial sketches to the early construction as well as a later look at construction nearing completion. We invite you to take a look back and learn more about the project and the process!

bainbridge island farm house architecture | CTA Design Builds | Seattle Architects 

Craftsman Homes Seminar this Saturday!

Julie will be giving a seminar this Saturday, October 6th, at 1:00 at the Wallingford Historic Homes Fair!

Craftsman Homes in the Modern Age: Craftsman homes were traditionally, and intentionally designed to create a cozy hand-made retreat; a sanctuary that would provide connection with nature and sustenance to the soul. This lecture will illuminate that original design rationale to guide you if you’re planning to remodel an existing home, or build a new Craftsman style home.

craftsman home architecture details

Close up of a craftsman home in the Wallingford neighborhood of Seattle.

 

For more information, visit https://www.historicwallingford.org/events/homes-fair-2018/

poster for wallingford historic homes fair

Creating a Craftsman Home in a Modern Age – Part 3: Craftsman Interiors

As we’ve described in our first two installments in this Craftsman series, Bungalow home design here in the US was heavily influenced by the Arts & Crafts movement, and led to a unique American architectural style known for modest but lovely homes. The architecture focused on a functional arrangement of spaces with windows, built-in furniture and trim details that reinforced the goal of integrating beauty, practicality, warmth and comfort. Hand-craftsmanship was key; houses boasted a rich palette of woods, tile, pottery, stained glass and textiles.

In this blog, we’ll cover the major interior elements of traditional Craftsman homes, and offer advice on how these same elements may be interpreted in a more contemporary manner today.

Traditional Craftsman homes typically had floor plans with rooms that were open and flowed one into the next. A living room might have a “cased opening” (wide door opening with trim around it, but no door) which opened into the dining area, making these smallish rooms feel larger and more spacious. The focus of these living spaces was usually the fireplace – designed to be the main focal point in the house. Often an “inglenook” was designed around the fireplace: built-in seats and bookcases, along with a textured brick or tile surround and prominent wood mantel, ensured maximum visibility and impact for the “home and hearth” of the house, inviting one to snuggle up and retreat from the world!

In the two photos below, see how we designed fireplaces in two very different homes: one is an island cabin featuring lots of bookcases, nook window seat, and a mantle alcove to achieve that same cozy quality. The second photo is from our Daring Downsize, a recent remodel of more contemporary home but it still uses the same technique of built-in bench nook and wood paneling to impart a warm intimate space close-in to the fireplace.



Wood was always a key material throughout these old Craftsman homes, seen left in the Island Cabin. Paneling or wainscoting with plate rails on top was a common means for display of knick-knacks, floors were usually oak and often featured decorative ribbon details around the perimeter of rooms, and ceilings were often low and featured coffers to demarcate different spaces. As a result, these homes were rather dark and poorly lit, as you can see in this next photo. Today’s homeowners often want a lighter and airier feel to their interiors, which can pose a challenge to the Craftsman purist!


See this next photo of our Queen Anne Four Square where our clients wanted a lighter touch within their craftsman home. We incorporated classic Craftsman elements but used a mix of painted and natural wood to create a cozy but more light-filled space.

Here, living/dining/family rooms are all open to each other via cased openings or partial height walls, with ceiling coffers to demarcate spaces. Note built-in bookcases and small upper windows flanking the fireplace (just to the left of the picture frame), and dark ribboning in flooring perimeter.

CTA Design Builds | Queen Anne Four Square Redux 3

The adjacent kitchen (next photo) transitions to fir cabinetry within these same painted spaces.

Traditional Craftsman kitchens were small and simple, not having all the appliances we now enjoy. But they did feature windows for better lighting, built-in cabinets, and usually a subway tile backsplash! Below is the kitchen in Greene & Greene’s beloved Gamble House in Pasadena. More modest homes often featured built-in seating for dining nooks.


Our Island Cabin kitchen features a corner window seat and dining nook. Note the very simple fir Craftsman cabinetry, including Craftsman style brackets at the counter overhang.

And below are a few other photos of our recent Craftsman projects, to demonstrate how these same principals can be incorporated into various other spaces within a modern home.


Note the built-in oak dresser, and classic Craftsman-style window & door trim on the Craftsman Charmer.

A couple of bathrooms: natural materials, simple fir cabinetry, built-ins & paneling! Dark bronze hardware & fixtures is often our finish of choice. Seen here are the Island Cabin and River Run residences.


Built-in details on the Island Cabin help create scale and coziness, and impart a lovely hand-crafted patina to a home.


And last: a mudroom to manage all of life’s stuff!

Creating a Craftsman Home in a Modern Age – Part 1

It’s fascinating to us as architects to see how interest in Craftsman style homes ebbs and flows over time. After a decade of great enthusiasm for pseudo Craftsman designs in large homes in the suburbs, and then watching that trend dissipate, we are now seeing a resurgence of a more studied appreciation of the Craftsman style in Seattle and elsewhere.

Suburban Craftsman tract home circa 1990’s

The real thing in an ad circa 1910

We have some thoughts on why this may be happening, and tips on getting it right if Craftsman appeals to you! But first some historical context…

Craftsman style had its roots in the Arts and Crafts movement in Britain in the late 1800’s. This was a time of great mechanization, later called the age of the Industrial Revolution, when people moved in droves to cities and the promise of burgeoning factory jobs. Many struggled to find meaning in this new world and felt alienated, separated from their cultural traditions, crafts and countryside. The Arts and Crafts movement was born out of this discontent; it was a resurrection of the long-held values of hand-craftsmanship in reaction to the dehumanizing effect of factory life and industrial labour.

Major influencers of this time included the likes of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and William Morris – both designers of a broad range of decorative arts and architecture. Morris’s philosophy was to unite all arts within the decoration of the home – emphasizing nature and simplicity of form.  Here in the USA, the Arts and Crafts movement also resonated; Gustav Stickley was an influential proponent of the craftsman ideal; he was the founder of Craftsman Workshops and The Craftsman journal – a beacon for the American Arts & Crafts movement.


He gained great notoriety through his furniture manufacturing company, offering designs governed by honest construction, simple lines, and good quality materials.

The Greene brothers (Charles & Henry Greene) in California have come to be known as the most influential architects of the American Arts and Crafts movement. Their renowned (and heart-breakingly beautiful) Gamble House in Pasadena is considered the quintessential Craftsman house; its design showcases all the elements of a classic Craftsman home, which I will elaborate on in the next installment of this blog series.

Gamble House by Greene & Greene

But back to my theory of why appreciation of Craftsman style architecture keeps cycling back through our consciousness!…

As I’ve described very briefly above, because of its early roots in opposition to mechanization and alienation from nature, Craftsman architecture is inherently a style emphasizing nature and craftsmanship. No matter the size of the house, or wealth of its owner, the home was designed to create a cozy hand-made retreat; a sanctuary that would provide connection with nature and sustenance to the soul.  In a world that can seem alienating at times, no wonder this uniquely humane architectural style keeps nudging us!

Watch for Part 2 when we’ll dive into specific design elements that make Craftsman homes so unique, both past and contemporary.

Contemporary Washington Cabin

We’re very excited to see construction start on our latest vacation home! This family retreat sits high on a bluff looking over mountains, vast orchards and vineyards in every direction.



Our architectural design takes advantage of unobstructed southern exposure, which also provides the best view of the austere scenery. Huge folding glass doors connect the great rooms (living areas, dining and kitchen) to the views and outdoors, flanked by a bedroom wing on one side, and garage and studio on the other. This configuration creates an outdoor patio space that is sheltered from frequent strong winds, framing the spectacular views. In such a vast landscape that sees extreme weather variance, we felt the architecture of this house should be low and close to the ground, incorporating elements that withstand high winds, beating sun, and heavy snows. Materials are simple and natural, allowing the structure to blend into its surroundings: stained wood, concrete, glass, and metal roof.

 

The house is a contemporary wood-frame structure with a very dominant roof element made of Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs). These are prefabricated, insulated panels that are trucked in and craned up onto the roof framing, enabling the roof to be completed in a very short time.  The panels allow for large overhangs, desirable for shading of sun in this hot, dry summer climate.


Public spaces in the home have a high roof, allowing for maximum light; the bedroom wing has a lower roof, creating spaces that are more private and intimate in feeling. Below, you can see the glu-lam joists, with their protective covers almost completely removed.



A local contractor is building this project; stay tuned on progress with us as he sends us photos with progress updates!

San Juan Islands Build – Update

Our house is nearing completion! Designing this unique custom home, and then watching it come to life has been such a rich experience…a process that no architect ever tires of!

Once the wall board was up and finished, the carpenters started work on the extensive interior trim package and custom finishing. You can see from the photos here that the craftsmanship is superb!

We’ve included a couple of early computer renderings here so you can get a sense of the overall spaces, and figure out where the photos are shown. Next to come are interior finishes: flooring, tile – some of which has been lovingly hand-made by our owner!, light and plumbing fixtures. Click on the photos for enlargements.  Stay tuned!

To check out the beautiful San Juan’s and see what they have to offer, click here!